our range

black tea

black tea
As a general rule, black teas have a higher caffeine content and depth of flavour than other types of tea. Black tea is withered by being left in warm air for up to 18 hours, then rolled to crush the cells and activate the oxidation process, and finally fired once the leaves are fully-oxidised.

oolong tea

oolong tea
Sitting somewhere between green teas and black teas, oolong teas are mainly grown in China and Taiwan. They're often the connoisseur's choice due to their lightness of touch coupled with complex flavours. The leaves are withered and then shaken every few hours to break cells and activate the oxidation process. The leaves are fired when they have reached semi-fermentation (from 30% to 75% oxidation).

green tea

green tea
Green tea, revered in the Far East for millennia, is finding new friends in the West and has become a permanent fixture on the UK tea scene. The leaves are unoxidised as they're exposed to heat (they are either roasted in wok-like pans or steamed) soon after picking to avoid the oxidation process, so are high in antioxidants and low in caffeine. As a general rule, green teas are much lighter than black teas. 

white tea

white tea
White teas are among the rarest in the world, only produced on a very limited scale. The young buds are traditionally plucked at daybreak while they are still sleeping (unopened) and are among the most carefully harvested and processed of all teas. White teas are unoxidised and usually naturally-dried, making them deliciously delicate. A real treat.

infusion tea

infusion tea
Not actually teas because fruit and herbal infusions are not from the tea plant (camellia sinensis) but they are delicious and we know that you love them so we had to include them. Our herbal and fruit infusions are naturally caffeine-free and often offer additional health benefits.